Curtain Call

Concert with Thomas Hampson and young artists from the International Opera Studio with scenes and arias from Mozart's «Così fan tutte», as well as selected songs by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert.

Sopran Erica Petrocelli
Mezzosopran Siena Licht Miller
Tenor Savelii Andreev
Tenor Luca Bernard
Tenor Luis Magallanes
Bariton Thomas Hampson
Bariton Yannick Debus
Bassbariton Andrew Moore

Klavier Joanna Laszczkowska
Klavier William Green
Klavier Adam Rogala
Hammerklavier Enrico Maria Cacciari

Over Christmas and New Year's Eve, with the generous support of Zürich Versicherungen and Freunde der Oper Zürich, we present the «Curtain Call» series. Prominent singers meet at eye level with the up-and-coming talents of the International Opera Studio and create a concert evening together. This concert series is also the prelude to our anniversary year – 60 years of Freunde der Oper Zürich and 60 years of the International Opera Studio.

Behind the scenes with Thomas Hampson and the IOS

Take a look behind the scenes of the workshop with Thomas Hampson. As one of the most important song interpreters of his generation, the American baritone works with the young artists of the International Opera Studio on expression and stage presence.

Curtain Call with Thomas Hampson and the IOS

Enjoy selected songs by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert as well as scenes and arias from Mozarts «Così fan tutte». Thomas Hampson can be experienced in one of his parade roles: Don Alfonso.

The Videos are available until Sunday, January 17 2021, 24.00.

The American baritone Thomas Hampson can look back on a rare world career; he has sung the great operatic roles of his profession in groundbreaking interpretations time and again at Zurich Opera House. The initial spark for his musical life, however, came in his youth with the songs of Franz Schubert, and lied singing has never left him since. Today he is considered one of the most important Lied interpreters of his generation; he has not only led the German-language Lied to interpretative heights, but has also earned the highest merits in the field of American music. His artistic achievements have been repeatedly recognized by the most important awards in the music world, and numerous CD and DVD recordings attest to his extremely diverse oeuvre.

But Thomas Hampson is not only a world-renowned performer, he is also a music researcher and passionate teacher who knowledgeably passes on his many years of experience to talented young singers in numerous master classes. Thus, he not only pursues an active teaching career in the USA (including at the Manhattan School of Music), but is also the founder and artistic director of the Lied Academy of the Heidelberg Spring Festival.

In his master class, he will combine opera and Lied and can be experienced himself in one of his parade roles: As Don Alfonso from Mozart's Così fan tutte, as the older, life-experienced friend of Ferrando and Guglielmo, in other words, who instigates the two young men to make the famous bet that will help them find out whether their wives are really faithful to them.

«Curtain Call» is presented by    
The workshops are made possible through the support of the Friends of Zurich Opera.

Find the booklet here:


Tell us Erica...


Erica Petrocelli

«When I’m on stage, I love feeling the energy from the audience. Every audience is like its own unique entity, and makes each performance different and exciting. Becoming an opera singer takes an unbelievable amount of discipline, work ethic, a little madness… but feeds the soul.»

When and why did you decide to become an opera singer?
I decided to become an opera singer in my senior year of high school. I performed in a recital for my voice studio at the time, and realized in that moment that I could not live without it.

If I hadn't become an opera singer, I would be …
… either an interpreter or a visual artist.

Which was your most precious experience on stage so far?
Singing Musetta in Barrie Kosky’s production of «La Bohème» – amazing costumes, fun staging, and the concertato in Act 2 is just the best.

… the most embarrassing moment?
Performing in the chorus of «Candide», and barely making a quick change before El Dorado… Trying to maintain composure onstage in a wig cap (no wig) and a barely laced up corset.

… the biggest challenge?
My biggest challenge was stepping in for the final dress rehearsal of Matt Aucoin’s «Eurydice» at LA Opera, with barely any rehearsal, in front of some very important people.

Thinking of your career, what would be your biggest dream?
My biggest dream would be performing with my fiancé conducting.

Do you have a lucky charm or a ritual before going on stage?
I am a huge lover of yoga, and always make sure I do 30-60 seconds of deep yoga breathing to calm myself before stepping onstage.

My secret weapon to prevent hoarseness:
A secret from a dear teacher of mine – gargling hot water, olive oil, vinegar, and salt. Definitely gross, but works every time!

My idol:
Mirella Freni

Which opera character do you identify with the most and why?
This is very difficult as most every great opera character is dying, suicidal, or kills someone else… I’m going to go with Komponist from «Ariadne auf Naxos» – sublime music, trying to find the deeper meaning of life.

This song speaks out of the fullness of my heart:
The last song of the «Liebesbriefchen» by Korngold – «Fern von dir denk ich dein»

Which is you favorite place in Zürich and why?
Simply sitting in front of the lake by the opera house plaza. Doesn’t get much more beautiful than that.

What is your favorite word in Swiss German?
«Chuchichäschtli!»

Erica Petrocelli, soprano, comes from the USA. 
The twenty-eight year old has been a member of the IOS since the 2O/21 season.



Tell us Luis...


Luis Magallanes

«For me, opera is the biggest performance art, the most exciting and the most beautiful. Becoming an opera singer is one of the most beautiful gifts that life has given me. When I’m on stage I’m the happiest person in the world.»

When and why did you decide to become an opera singer?
10 years ago, because I watched a Video of Juan Diego Florez doing a concert in Venezuela and that was the inspiration.

If I hadn't become an opera singer, I'd be …
a teacher probably. Or a Fútbol journalist (hahaha).

Which was your most precious experience on stage so far?
The last one, singing on the main stage at Opernhaus Zürich for an audition.

… the most embarrassing moment?
Oh Lord, my pants fell down during a rehearsal of «Così fan Tutte» in Venezuela.

… the biggest challenge?
The last Rossini Coloratura

And what would be your biggest dream?
To have a beautiful career, starting with a debut at Opernhaus Zürich.

Do you have a lucky charm or a ritual before going on stage?
Drink water, smile and go!

My secret weapon to prevent hoarseness:
It won’t be a secret anymore if I tell (only joking): Sleep well and drink enough water.

My idol:
My mother.

Which opera character do you identify with the most and why?
Considering the few roles that I know, I think could be Nemorino.

This song speaks out of the fullness of my heart:
A Venezuelan song called: «Tonada del cabestrero»

Which is you favorite place in Zürich and why?
Opernhaus Zürich, because it’s where magical things happen.

What is your favorite word in Swiss German?
Oh God! I don’t know so many, maybe «En Guete».

Luis Magallanes, tenor, comes from Venezuela. 
The thirty-year-old has been a member of the IOS since the 2O/21 season.



Tell us Yannick...


Yannick Debus

«When I’m on stage I can be whoever I want, I am free and it fulfills me.»

When and why did you decide to become an opera singer?
When I was about 25 years old and already in my studies at university. It came much more naturally to me than playing an instrument and it gave me always so much joy to perform.

If I hadn't become an opera singer…
I'd be a political scientist

Which was your most precious experience on stage so far?
Singing in the choir under the baton of Maestro Christoph Eschenbach the «2nd Symphony» of Gustav Mahler.

… the most embarrassing moment?
Having learned the wrong piece for a concert and then side-reading in the dress rehearsal.

… the biggest challenge?
Studying and learning the role of Leporello by heart in 2 and a half weeks

And what would be your biggest dream?
Never losing my love for music

Do you have a lucky charm or a ritual before going on stage?
I do a short meditation to focus.

My secret weapon to prevent hoarseness:
Take one day off a week when I don’t sing at all.

My idol:
Giorgio Zancanaro, Fritz Wunderlich and Tito Gobbi

Which opera character do you identify with the most and why?
Guglielmo from «Così fan tutte». He thinks he is cleverer than he actually is.

This song speaks out of the fullness of my heart:
«Du bist die Ruh» (Schubert)

Which is you favorite place in Zürich and why?
The lake. The water is so incredibly clear and spending a summer day at the waterside is very relaxing.

What is your favorite word in Swiss German?
«Chuchichäschtli»

Yannick Debus, baritone, comes from Germany. 
The twenty-nine-year-old has been with the IOS since the 2O/21 season.



Tell us Andrew...


Andrew Moore

«For me, Opera is the place where I can be someone else for a night. A chance for me to sing someone else’s story.»

When and why did you decide to become an opera singer?
I began my journey in music studying music education to become a music teacher. I really loved the idea of giving back and teaching music because, for me, music was something I really cherished growing up. It wasn’t until my senior year of college where after several convincing conversations with my voice teacher, I decided to try performing. It was after my first performance in my first opera (guglielmo in «Così fan Tutte») where I thought to myself «I could get used to this...». It was such a rewarding feeling. Being able to use my voice to tell a story to an audience. I loved it. Since then, I began performing much more over the years, and has now taken me up to be in Zurich with the IOS.

If I hadn't become an opera singer, I'd be …
A flavor chemist. Chemistry was my favorite subject in school, and I wanted to work in a food science laboratory and create new ways of creating foods and flavorings with natural and man made ingredients.

Which was your most precious experience on stage so far?
I think my most precious moment was having the chance to sing some of the role of Papageno on the San Francisco opera stage with a full house in the audience. It was a feeling unlike any other and I treasure it, as it was my first time singing on the stage of a major house.

… the most embarrassing moment?
Once I was in a production of «Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat». There was a dance break, and in the show I had on the craziest wig. During the dance break, one of the dancers grabbed my neck in her choreography, and as she turned, she took my wig with her! And there I was: standing on stage in a bald cap. The entire audience burst into laughter. It was very fun though, I played it off very well. Something I will never forget.

… the biggest challenge?
Languages. Languages have always been a struggle for me. I work extra hard to make sure that I really understand my text and that things are pronounced as well as a native speaker would. I was once told the best advice by a colleauge that said: «Learn a new word in a different language everyday. This way, in a year, you would have learned 365 new words». When she put it like that, my struggle with languages became something that challenges me, but keeps me motivated to work hard and improve.

And what would be your biggest dream?
I’m not super sure what my biggest dream would be, to be honest. Being in this wonderful place like Zürich, is something a year ago I would have never imagined for myself. I have no idea what lies in front of me for the future, but im excited for the journey ahead.

Do you have a lucky charm or a ritual before going on stage?
Every night before a big performance, I use the small area in my bedroom and do a mini walk and talk, where I go through the motions and text of the show. It sounds crazy, but going to bed with a good feeling of confidence is key and helps me get a good night sleep for the next day.

My secret weapon to prevent hoarseness:
Tons and tons of sleep and not talking.

My idol:
Sam Ramey

Which opera character do you identify with the most and why?
Alfredo in «La Traviata». Although I am not a tenor, I am 100% a hopeless romantic. Someone who pursues not as a heroic chivalry act, but out of genuine love and affection. He loves deeply.

This song speaks out of the fullness of my heart:
«An die Musik» (Schubert)

Which is you favorite place in Zurich and why?
There is a little farm area on top of Sonnenberg past the Dolder called Adlisberg. It’s the cutest place and it has a really good restaurant with great food. I absolutely love it here.

What is your favorite word in Swiss German?
«Öpfuchüechli»

Andrew Moore, bass baritone, comes from the USA. 
The twenty-five year old has been a member of the IOS since the 2O/21 season.